Writing an Obituary for Your Loved One

Passare.com shutterstock 435712021 Writing an Obituary for Your Loved One  Grief Loss and Bereavement funeral Family End of life care death Childrens Grief

Writing an obituary is an important way to honor your loved one’s life and to announce their passing. While it may seem emotionally challenging it celebrates their achievements and legacy. It may also help you process the grief experienced after your loved one’s death.

Most obituaries contain the following information:.

  • Biographical facts and photograph – Include your loved one’s full name, birth date and place and most recent residence. Add a current or favorite photograph.
  • Date and location of death – You may choose to add the cause of death.
  • Survivors – List your deceased loved one’s spouse, children and their spouses if applicable, parents, siblings and other close relatives. Add predeceased loved ones in birth order after listing living family members.
  • Background facts – Include accomplishments like education, employment, affiliations, hobbies, and charitable or military service.
  • Final services information – Provide the date, time and location of funerals, memorials, viewings or wakes. Add the funeral provider’s telephone contact, for example, so others may call for information.
  • Suggested memorial contributions – Offering loved ones a way to take action can help them to heal. Request contributions to memorial accounts or charities.  Add the address or website for donations to organizations that were important to your loved one.

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One Response to “Writing an Obituary for Your Loved One”

  1. G Harris

    I recommend caution in placing a full date of birth and mother’s maiden name in the obituary due to the fact it can provide valuable information for identity theft. Place what information will assist someone in confirmiing the deceased identiy as that as the individual they know or relationships they will connect without giving away too much information. Immediate family will most likely know when and where someone was born as well as their parents names.

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